CBP Responds to Call for Aid Following Hurricane Maria (Videos)

Urgently needed generators are loaded on an AMO P-3 destined for Aguadilla, Puerto Rico. (Image courtesy of Carlos Rivera, CBP)
Urgently needed generators are loaded on an AMO P-3 destined for Aguadilla, Puerto Rico. (Image courtesy of Carlos Rivera, CBP)

In the wake of Hurricane Maria, CBP is responding to the call for support and aid.

Locating and assisting employees and others affected by the storm remains CBP’s top priority.

Air and Marine Operations (AMO) is shuttling several P-3 aircraft between Miami and Puerto Rico, bringing in gas cans and supplies and then returning with evacuating employees and their families.

The P-3s are from the National Air Security Operations Center, Jacksonville, and the National Air Security Operations Center Corpus Christi.

Aircraft from the Miami Air and Marine Branch are also involved in the relief.

P-3 aircraft are also relaying communications and coordinating air traffic.

(Image courtesy of Ken Caves, CBP)
(Image courtesy of Ken Caves, CBP)

Bringing a human touch to the calamity, one CBP P-3 pilot purchased toys for the children returning on his aircraft.

Before leaving Jacksonville yesterday pilot Ken Caves packed a bag of toys for the kids, reasoning the toys may help them relax.

“They’re leaving everything behind and getting on an aircraft and going to a city they know nothing about,” he said.

“There’s lots of upheaval.” For all the evacuees on board, Caves brought along chicken, rice and beans.

“We thought a little home cooking would be nice,” Caves said.

Stockpiled gas cans await shipment to Puerto Rico. (Image courtesy of Ozzy Trevino, CBP)
Stockpiled gas cans await shipment to Puerto Rico. (Image courtesy of Ozzy Trevino, CBP)

On the ground, CBP Special Response Teams are working to account for employees.

As of Sunday morning, 654 the 678 CBP employees in Puerto Rico have been located, according to Dario Lugo, CBP Emergency Operations Center manager, located in Washington, D.C.

Fuel shortages have created more demand for security.

Arrangements are being made to guard fuel depots and escort fuel trucks to their destinations, according to CBP Officer Christian Miranda, program manager, Admissibility Review Office.

(AMO P-3 crews from the National Air Security Operations Center – Jacksonville conduct communications relay and air traffic coordination following Hurricane Maria. Additionally, crews are transporting much needed supplies into Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and returning with evacuating employees. Courtesy of Ozzy Trevino, CBP, Bridget Bosch and YouTube)

“Drivers are reluctant to drive alone considering the conditions,” he said.

CBP has also engaged cruise ships to bring supplies to the island and return to Miami with CBP evacuees.

Tanker ships will transport fuel, Miranda noted.

“Ships can bring in so much more fuel.”

Furthermore, the CBP was instrumental in rescue operations and support following both Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma.

(A Caribbean-based Air and Marine Operations aircrew conducts a rescue mission on Jost Van Dyke island, British Virgin Islands. This video depicts a hoist operator deploying a rescue specialist (who is also an Air and Marine Emergency Medical Service member and EMT) onto the beach to rescue a stranded resident. The resident sustained significant injuries as a result of Hurricane Irma. The hoist operator extracts the rescue specialist and subject safely back into the helicopter. Posted on Sep 7, 2017)